“I fear not the man who has practiced 10,000 kicks once, but I fear the man who has practiced one kick 10,000 times.” – Bruce Lee

They say it takes 10,000 hours to master a skill. Until it’s truly mastered, there’s a game we like to play in our ignorance:

The “Make it way more complicated than it needs to be” game. It’s no different while producing meaningful work for the marketplace:

The better the product, the less ‘features’ you need.

What better way to disguise a lack of design prowess than to pepper work with gimmicks?

What better way to mask a weak product than a littering of bonuses?

Complexity is a place to hide. Mastery lies beyond.

The harder you qualify, the easier you close.

A fear of turning anyone away becomes a fear of qualifying prospects.

Which turns into desperation during closing time.

Which turns into more ‘features’ and other distractions.

Fear is a place to hide. Mastery lies beyond.

The simpler the pricing, the easier the enrollment.

A lack of clarity over how to price something becomes ‘options’.

Options become an elaborate matrix of confusing configurations.

Elaborate matrixes of nuanced configurations turn away prospects.

Nuance is a place to hide. Mastery lies beyond.

You might have too many ‘kicks’ in your training. What if you traded them for mastery?