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ADAM’S BLOG

All posts from December 2018

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385: A gift to yourself ​

Christmas is when we give others gifts. New Years is when we give ourselves a gift.

  • Permission to fail is a good gift. It’ll allow us to have a noteworthy year where our work can thrive.
  • The commitment to a discipline is a good gift. No New Years resolution will work without discipline.
  • The key to our own happiness is a great gift. The gifts above don’t work so well at all without this one.

Symbolically wrap it up, or simply give it in the quiet of your mind. But don’t forget to get yourself something today.

Happy New Year.

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384: The year doesn’t stay new for long ​

“New Year” means new possibilities. We feel ready to make the most of every day.

  • What about February? Still in dreaming-mode, maybe we’ll really get started next week?
  • What about July? Where we’re in the second half of the year, maybe the first half was for planning?
  • What about November? Where the year’s almost over. Maybe next year will be the year we make it happen?

Remember the energy you have for the new year now, so you can operate from it year-long, and avoid the above scenario from being your reality. You and your team deserve better.

You got this.

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383: Reversing is expensive ​

“Going backwards” is a metaphor for doing things wrong. Why is that?

  • It costs us more on our projects when we have to waste money and energy discarding where we’ve been, only to cover the same–or similar–ground again.
  • It takes longer to create shippable work when we’re busy reworking what we’ve already made.
  • We’re no good at it, are we? We don’t tend to plan for–or practice–reversing as much as we do going forward.

Reversing means going back and doing it again. Rerouting means changing course for the better with the path of learning still intact.

The path to progress is as important as the progress itself.
Our work is too important to throw that away with Reverse gear.

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382: Little trials ​

People find success in various different ways. For teams doing meaningful work, it seems the secret of big success… is small success, repeated.

  • Big things don’t get done. Little things get done.
  • When little things fail, we find another way and win that way instead. Then we move onto the next little thing and repeat the exercise.
  • That’s how big things are made. The trick is to never stop doing little things. To just keep doing them. When we feel like it, and when we don’t.

This little space between Christmas and 2019 is an opportunity to create a new habit of little trials before the new year begins.

No breaks, no excuses, just something that’ll lead to something wonderful.

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381: Changing characters ​

Between Christmas and New Year lies a few strange days where nobody really knows what day it is. We feel ready for change in the new year. But are we really?

  • The character we play in life can change whenever we choose, yet we’re hooked on playing the role rather than breaking the mold.
  • Changing characters is weird to start with, whether it’s modifying a behavior we’re known for, or Jim Halpert starring in a Tom Clancy movie.
  • Our work benefits when we remember the new character might better serve our work, our team, and our collective goals.

It’s only weird to see Jim–err, John, in a serious role for a couple of episodes. Then the new identity suits the role much better than Jim ever could.

How could 2019 benefit from a modification of the character you play?

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380: Guilty before or after ​

It’s the day after Christmas. Feeling guilty yet?

  • Feeling guilty before an event is a sign we might be missing out on something great. This is “good guilt” and can motivate us to say “yes” to great new opportunities.
  • Feeling guilty after an event is a sign we might have made a mistake. This “bad guilt” means we either made a bad decision or that the person (or company) we trusted took us for granted.

Companies should leverage “good guilt” and avoid “bad guilt” at all costs. Most get this the wrong way around. Does yours?